Welcome to HHMI-ASHG Fellow Jennifer Hu

Posted by: Staff

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Jennifer Hu, HHMI-ASHG Medical Research Fellow (Courtesy Ms. Hu)

In partnership with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), we’re excited to welcome HHMI-ASHG Medical Research Fellow Jennifer Hu, BS, to a year-long position studying arteriovenous malformations. Jennifer, a medical student, is one of 79 HHMI Fellows who will begin their research experience this summer, at laboratories across the U.S.

“The Med Fellows Program allows exceptional MD, DVM, and DDS students to effectively shift course and conduct rigorous research at top institutions across the country…we hope that each student comes away further empowered to pursue a career as a physician-scientist,” said David Asai, senior director in science education at HHMI in a press release.

Jennifer, currently a third-year medical student at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, will be working with longtime ASHG member Matthew Warman, MD, at the Boston Children’s Hospital. Her project involves understanding how somatic mutations can drive the formation of vascular anomalies – in particular, arteriovenous malformations.

“The options for children currently affected by AVMs are limited and they often recur despite the best medical and surgical efforts,” Jennifer explained. “Using a mouse model, we aim to recapitulate somatic mutations that have been previously identified from patient tissues. Showing that this mutation can recreate the AVM in a mouse model will allow us to understand the development of the disease and have a new model in which to test existing or new therapies,” she said.

Long term, Jennifer plans to build upon this experience to become a physician-scientist. “In medicine, we often hear the phrase, ‘treat the patient, not the disease.’ Our ever-growing understanding of genetics makes disease personal. As a future physician-investigator, I want to partner with patients in research, not just do research with patients,” she said.

Launched 28 years ago, the HHMI Medical Research Fellows Program supports each Fellow through a year-long research project with a mentor of the Fellow’s choosing, and also facilitates peer networking among Fellows and alumni as well as seminars with senior investigators. For more information, see the Program website.

Congrats to the 2017 DNA Day Essay Contest Winners!

Posted by: Kanika Pulliam, PhD, and Evelyn Mantegani, BA, ASHG Education Department

Happy DNA Day! Every April 25, we commemorate the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003 and discovery of the double helix of DNA in 1953. ASHG marks this date each year by announcing the winners of our Annual DNA Day Essay Contest.

Open to high school students worldwide, the contest asks students to examine, question, and reflect on important concepts in genetics. This year’s theme was gene therapy. Students were asked to choose one modern example of gene therapy (since 2005), describe the disease or condition researchers are attempting to treat, and explain how the therapy or approach might repair the underlying cause of the disease or condition.

We received over 1100 essays from 38 U.S. states and 21 non-U.S. countries. Essays went through three rounds of scoring by ASHG members, who selected a first, second, and third place winner as well as 11 honorable mentions. ASHG will award monetary prizes to winning students as well as grants for genetics laboratory equipment to eligible teachers.

“This year’s essays continue the tradition of high-quality submissions…that we have seen for the past 12 years, and their enthusiasm for the science reflects the excitement that our members feel about their work,” said Joseph D. McInerney, MS, Executive Vice President of ASHG, in a press release.

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Adele Peng, a freshman at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Alexandria, Virginia, received first place for her essay on using zinc finger nucleases to immunize against HIV. Sophia Spiegel, a junior at Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, New Jersey, received second place for her essay on using recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors to treat Leber’s Congenital Amaurosis. And Alvin Ya, a senior at Poolesville High School in Poolesville, Maryland, received third place for his essay on potential uses of CRISPR to treat muscular dystrophy.

For a full list of winners and honorable mentions, teachers, and excerpts from winning essays, check out the DNA Day 2017 Winners. Through this contest and our other K-12 initiatives, we hope to encourage young people to explore genetics and inspire the next generation of ASHG members and leaders.

Kanika Pulliam, PhD, Educational Programs Manager at ASHG, and Evelyn Mantegani, BA, Educational Programs Assistant, organized the DNA Day Essay Contest for high school students. Learn more about ASHG’s efforts in K-12 education.

ASHG is Partnering with the March for Science

Posted by: Nancy Cox, PhD, ASHG President, and Joe McInerney, MS, ASHG Executive Vice President

20170413_March-supporter_logoWe’re happy to share that ASHG has signed on as an official partner to the March for Science, taking place April 22, 2017, in Washington, DC and at 425+ sister marches around the world. As genetics specialists and enthusiasts, we know firsthand how valuable science is to society – indeed, it may be what brought many of us to science in the first place. We look forward to celebrating the passion and dedication of scientists worldwide, and to recognizing the enormous support and respect people around the world have for the scientific endeavor.

Nancy Cox, PhD, ASHG President, directs the Vanderbilt Genetics Institute and is a Mary Phillips Edmonds Gray Professor of Genetics. She is also the Director of and a Professor of Medicine in the Vanderbilt Division of Genetic Medicine. Joe McInerney, MS, is the Executive Vice President of ASHG.