Using the ASHG Career Center: Tips for Job Seekers

Posted By: Evelyn Mantegani, Public Education & Engagement Specialist

Earlier this year, ASHG launched the Career Center. This online job board connects the innovative and energetic members of ASHG with the newest positions open in the human genetics and genomics community. At no cost, ASHG members can post their resume and search for their next position.

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Visit the ASHG Career Center at https://careers.ashg.org/

Here’s how to most effectively use this resource to find your next position.

Set up Job Alerts. Let the system find new jobs for you: set up your preferred job search criteria, including location, discipline, and level. You will then automatically receive a notification whenever a matching job is posted.

Create Your Searchable Portfolio. Increase your exposure to employers by uploading up to five career-related documents, such as work samples or certification letters.

Preview Your Job Applications. Before submitting your application, you can preview it as an employer will see it.

Check the Commute. Assess a potential commute right from the job detail screen. The Google Map feature will display a map with the distance between your home and the employer.

Save Potential Jobs. Save up to 100 jobs to a folder in your account so you come back to apply when you are ready.

Review Your References. For a discounted fee starting at $79.20 for members, experienced professionals will call your references to learn what they are telling prospective employers. All checks are done with complete discretion and confidentiality.

Have Your Resume Reviewed. The ASHG Career Center provides resume rewriting and critiques, starting at $29.95. This resource is available for resumes and cover letters from entry to executive level.

Find all ASHG Career Resources in One Place. The resources section compiles all career resources provided by ASHG. Browse this page for job application guidance, interviews with professionals across career sectors, and more.

Communication and Documentation Standards at Biocuration 2019

Posted By: Marina DiStefano, PhD, ASHG Communications Committee

I recently returned from the ISB Biocuration 2019 conference in Cambridge, UK. To me, this year’s conference focused on two of the core goals of the International Society for Biocuration (ISB): one, to promote communication and exchanges between curators and two, to encourage best practices by providing documentation on standards and annotation procedures.

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The group at the 2019 ISB Conference (photo courtesy of: George Georghiou)

Communication and Exchanges between Curators

Many presenters encouraged sharing of database resources and curation materials so as not to duplicate efforts and to facilitate transparency. For example, Rolf Apweiler, director of EMBL-EBI, discussed the Alliance of Genome resources, an effort to locate all curations of model organisms on the same website in a standardized format. The Alliance is founded by FlyBase, Mouse Genome Database, the Gene Ontology Consortium, Saccharomyces Genome Database, Rat Genome Database, WormBase, and the Zebrafish Information Network and contains information about six model organisms. In a related vein, Niklas Blomberg, director of ELIXIR, pointed out that many of the curation resources used by the entire scientific community are reliant on grant funding, making their future existence unstable. He discussed how resources should be defined as Core Data Resources to potentially solicit permanent stable funding.

There were also interactive workshops each afternoon that further supported this idea of communication between curators. One workshop, in which I presented, discussed the efforts of the Gene Curation Coalition (GenCC). This Coalition is an international group of gene curation resources with the goal of harmonizing the terms for defining clinical validity of gene:disease relationships. Three GenCC member groups (ClinGen, Genomics England PanelApp, and Orphanet) each took turns presenting their gene curation strategies. Participants were able to discuss the similarities and differences between the approaches. The workshop ended with survey results from the scientific community about the gene:disease validity terms.

Documentation and Standards

The more time I spend as a curator, the more I understand the value of consistent curation language. This idea was heartily supported by presenters at the conference who encouraged use of ontologies and the idea that each curation resource should strive to abide by FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable) data standards. Varsha Khodiyar, data curation editor at the journal Scientific Data, discussed how Springer Nature is trying to support FAIR data sharing to help reduce irreproducible experiments. Sirarat Sarntivijai, ELIXIR interoperability platform coordinator, spoke about recommended interoperability resources, tools that could be used by curators, creators of websites, or even authors to make data FAIR.

Many talks about specific resources, such as SIGNOR/DISNOR, SwissLipids, and the BioGRID Interaction database, cemented the idea that resources are most useful when they use ontologies to categorize terms.

The four days of this conference were a fascinating and important glimpse into the world of curation resources. After attending, it is quite clear that many of these resources are critical to the scientific community and keep research moving forward, thanks to the hard work of all the biocurators. The poster sessions were intimate and allowed for thoughtful discussion, useful suggestions, and hopefully the start of budding collaborations. Workshops were very interactive, and it was clear that the curators harbor a passion for their field of work and the work of their fellow curators.

If you have ever done or are planning on doing any curation, I highly recommend you attend this conference. The 13th International Biocuration Conference takes place in Bar Harbor, Maine from May 17-20, 2020.

Marina DiStefano, PhD, is a member of the ASHG Communications Committee and a postdoc at Harvard Medical School. She has been a member of ASHG since 2018.

Be Well to Do Well

Posted By: Ann Klinck, Communications and Marketing Assistant, ASHG

Earlier this month, ASHG hosted a webinar titled Resilience and Wellness, which focused on strategies to maintain your mental wellness in the scientific workplace and improve your resilience to the challenges and setbacks we all face.

Sharon Milgram, PhD, Director of the Office of Intramural Training and Education (OITE) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) reminded webinar listeners that to function at the highest capability, you must take your own well-being into consideration.

Developing Resilience

“Those who are resilient prepare to be resilient,” said Dr. Milgram. Developed through education, self-reflection, and practice, resilience can help a person navigate through adversity constructively. Here’s how:

  • People: Find people you can trust, who will give you energy when you feel stuck, and go to them to find compassion, a listening ear, or just companionship.
  • Process: Figure out what wellness practice or resources you can focus on that will help you in that moment.
  • Prepare: You cannot try to discover these things in a moment of crisis; you have to set yourself up for success.

Dr. Milgram also provided this helpful tool to identify characteristics of a resilient person.

Handling Our Inner Critic

To improve the way you view difficult situations or setbacks, analyze your self-talk. Are the stories you tell yourself harsher than they need to be? Consider whether you would say the things you tell yourself to a friend. Are you seeing the broader picture?

Destroying Cognitive Distortions

Dr. Milgram described cognitive distortions or automatic negative thoughts as “Characteristic ways that our mind convinces us of something that is really not true to reinforce negative thinking or emotions.” Some examples are:

  • All-or-nothing thinking: Your performance is either perfect or a complete failure.
  • Catastrophizing: You exaggerate the implications of a setback or mistake.
  • Mind reading: You make assumptions about what someone else is thinking.

Here’s how to tame them:

  • Journal to identify your most common negative thoughts.
  • Talk to mentors and peers.
  • Use your science voice to question them: Where is the evidence that this is the worst thing to ever happen in my life?
  • Be open to counseling when it’s unmanageable.

Never Feel Like an Imposter

Imposter fear is a type of cognitive distortion, qualified as “The feeling of phoniness in people who believe that they are not intelligent, capable, or creative despite evidence of high achievement.” Dr. Milgram pointed out that “If you are working towards a PhD in the sciences, if you are a postdoc, if you have been working as an undergraduate in a high-knowledge research environment, there is much evidence of high achievement already, though we often find ourselves feeling like fakes and phonies.”

Imposter fears include attributing success to luck or discounting your successes. You’re not alone! 70+% of individuals experience imposter fears at some point in their educational and work journey. Fight that feeling by practicing accepting praise and reminding yourself that impostor fears happen to everyone.

To Do Well, We Have to Be Well

Dr. Milgram provided a model of holistic self-care outlining four quadrants of wellness.

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In her shared slide deck, you can find a wellness assessment for each quadrant. While everyone defines these quadrants differently, each needs to be fulfilled to feel well. Dr. Milgram reminded us we can’t fix everything at once, and to take time to work on one area instead of trying to change too many habits too quickly.

Watch the full webinar, or check out our Twitter account to see live engagement from listeners!

What Difference Does Difference Make? An ASHG/FASEB Event on Diversity in Science

Posted by: Nalini Padmanabhan, MPH, Communications & Marketing Director, ASHG

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Shirley M. Malcom, PhD

“Diversity is a scientific imperative,” said Vence Bonham, JD, in his introductory remarks to last week’s ASHG/Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) event, titled “What Difference Does Difference Make?”. The event featured keynote speaker Shirley M. Malcom, PhD, Head of Education and Human Resource Programs at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), who led an informative, interactive, and spirited discussion among nearly 70 staff at ASHG, FASEB, and several other FASEB member societies.

With strong board support, ASHG is already undertaking steps within our community to improve diversity and inclusion in science and exploring additional efforts. By sharing ideas and feedback with AAAS, FASEB, and other scientific societies, who face similar challenges and operate in similar environments, we are committed to building on successful strategies to raise our collective effectiveness.

Diversity in Genomics Research and Among Researchers

Dr. Bonham, Chief of the Health Disparities Unit at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), set the stage by describing the importance of diversity in genomic research cohorts and in the genomics workforce. He cited several studies showing that the vast majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and genetics-based disease studies in the public domain focused on populations of European ancestry. Though there has been some change in recent years, he noted, populations of African, Latin American, and Asian ancestry are still significantly underrepresented.

Diversity in the scientific workforce follows similar patterns, he explained: data show the relative representation of African American scientists declines at each step along the career path, from graduate school applicant all the way through department head.

Access to Scientific Opportunity, Power, and Science as a Human Right

“The challenge we have in this country is that we are both too polite and too impolite. There are things we don’t talk about because it makes us uncomfortable, and part of the challenge we have had is that we have not been honest in our discourse,” said Dr. Malcom, framing her discussion. “Inequalities related to sex, gender, race, and ethnicity are all part of the same issue, which is the distribution of power. We don’t talk about power much, but it drives much of what we see that we do not like,” she explained.

The 1948 Declaration of Human Rights, recognized explicitly by most countries, includes the right to the benefits of scientific progress. Furthermore, she said, scientific curiosity is part of being human, and unequal access to a scientific career reflects differences in power within the field and the educational system. For example, those who set the research agenda define which questions the field considers important, how findings are assessed, and how success is attained. These decisions tell an implicit story about what science is, who science belongs to, and who can do science.

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Dr. Malcom & Dr. Bonham lead a Q&A

Diversity Discussions Have Improved but Challenges Remain

Taking a historical perspective, Dr. Malcom traced how discussions of diversity have evolved since the 1960s and 1970s. Originally considering it solely as a legal issue related to civil rights, many started to improve inclusivity out of need – demographic shifts and a growth in research required more talent in the workforce. More recently, there is growing appreciation of the educational value of diversity as well as the innovation driven by a variety of perspectives and experiences.

“Today, women are the majority of students in higher education but not of the faculty,” she said. “There’s a mismatch between who is there and who teaches them, which affects the climate of the classroom. We need to create a new normal.”

Structural barriers and biases impede progress toward that new normal. These include difficulty in finding community and cultivating a sense of belonging, systematic undervaluing from faculty and peers, and a false assumption that difference equals deficiency.

That starts from admissions, she explained. “We have to get to a point where our programs recognize potential, not previously demonstrated performance, because not everyone has had the opportunity to actually be able to be successful in tests that we use to measure.”

Strategies and Current Efforts to Improve Diversity

Given these challenges, what can scientific societies do to improve diversity? Dr. Malcom offered several practical strategies. These include several activities that are increasingly front and center for ASHG. This year, we are beginning to track and emphasize greater diverse representation in our Annual Meeting program, and are working actively to promote more nominations and inclusion of diverse candidates for roles in society leadership and awards.

ASHG also will be exploring ways we can leverage and share with the field the learning, resources, and strategies of other leading groups, including SEA Change, an AAAS effort to support diversity and inclusion in STEM, especially in colleges and universities. It focuses on science departments and programs, helping them to identify unhealthy factors and instill best practices that create healthy cultures and foster diversity.

While the issue is complex, Dr. Malcom is confident the outlook is positive and sees more potential for progress in the scientific community. “We have evolved in the way we think about diversity in science. Now I think we are at a point where we can begin to talk about diversity, equity, and inclusion as central for excellence in research,” she said. “We all have our biases, but the question is: what do you do in spite of them and how do you overcome them?”

Genetic Counseling Researchers Shape the Future of Precision Medicine 

Guest Post By: Heather A. Zierhut, PhD, MS, CGC; and Adam H. Buchanan, MS, MPH, LGC 

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Genetic counselors’ advanced training in – you guessed it – genetics and counseling, plays a key role in healthcare. Genetic counselors can guide and support people seeking more information about how inherited diseases and conditions might affect them or their families, and help interpret test results. While many genetic counselors work directly with patients, others focus on research to help in the development of new or improved treatment or care for people with genetic conditions. In honor of Genetic Counselor Awareness Day on Nov. 8, National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) members Heather A. Zierhut, PhD, MS, CGC, and Adam H. Buchanan, MS, MPH, LGC, share how their research is shaping the future of genetic counseling and precision medicine.

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Heather A. Zierhut, PhD, MS, CGC

NSGC: What inspired you to be a genetic counselor?  

Heather: I think there are two main categories of people who become genetic counselors: those who have a long exploration into the profession or those who have a light bulb moment. My entrance into genetic counseling was like a laser light show. My undergraduate genetics professor briefly mentioned the career. Like any good researcher, I went to my tiny matchbook size dorm room and looked up everything I could possibly find on the topic. Fireworks were going off in my mind. Genetic counseling was love at first literature search.

 

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Adam H. Buchanan, MS, MPH, LGC

Adam: I’m one of those long exploration types. In college I cycled through several possible career choices. My career research was a great source of stories about the (sometimes gross) lives of a veterinary technician or hospital employee who cleans up after surgeries. But, nothing grabbed me until I worked with a genetic counselor while doing my thesis in a master’s of public health program. I loved the way genetic counseling combined the communication skills I was learning as a public health educator with the connections you make while interacting with patients.

NSGC: How did you first get involved in genetic counseling research?  

Heather: Like many aspiring Principal Investigators, my gateway to research was undergraduate summer programs. I loved the idea of being able to set up experiments, ask questions, and get answers all in a three-month time span. But after experimenting in yeast and fruit fly labs, I found myself wanting to research something different. I switched gears to my ultimate organism of interest, humans. It all started with two genetics icons, Janet and Marc Williams, giving me a small research project looking at outcomes of early hearing screening tests. Even after making the decision to pursue genetic counseling, I never lost my desire for research. I searched for a training program where I could find mentors to support my interest in clinical care and research. The desire for research mentors was first and foremost in my decision to go to the University of Minnesota.

Adam: When my kids were little and their favorite question was “why?”, I knew they came by it honestly – it’s always been one of my favorite questions, too. As a genetic counselor I sought out ways to answer the whys that arose in my clinical work. Like Heather, I was fortunate to have colleagues willing to indulge those questions and a mentor who looked for opportunities to involve me in all phases of research during my research apprenticeship – including writing and reviewing manuscripts and learning the ins and outs of grant proposal preparation. So, when I was driving home from a rural cancer genetics clinic one day and had a light bulb moment about how to more efficiently improve access to care, I had the tools to turn that spark into a viable research project.

NSGC: What do you enjoy about genetic counseling research?  

Heather: You either love and appreciate the ups and downs of research or you gut out the experimentation period in hope and anticipation of the day you get those final results. As much as I wish I could say that I love to stop and smell the research roses, I do not. I am a destination data person. Getting results is my favorite part of research. It’s like the best holidays all wrapped into one called Data Day. Knowing this about myself, I chose to pursue a doctoral degree in genetics and epidemiology with research projects that give me data sooner rather than later.

Adam: I’m totally with Heather on her love of Data Day. I also love thinking about the research process as crafting a story. If everything falls into place, you develop this beautiful narrative that arcs from why your research topic is important to patients all the way to how the study you’ve proposed will generate data that will help those patients. It’s a challenging process that takes a lot of tinkering and being able to communicate the big picture while having your details in order. That’s why it’s such great fun when it works.

NSGC: What advice do you have for aspiring genetic counseling researchers? 

Heather: I shifted research directions completely after completing my PhD. The shift was the right direction for my newly developed skill set, but I needed help getting started. I reached out to people with expertise and asked them to assist me. I applied for numerous early investigator grants and was told repeatedly that I needed more experience in the field. Not letting it slow me down too much, I started collecting pilot data to build my case. Others in the field started to take notice and I was asked to be on several national committees. These combined efforts led to funding through the Jane Engelberg Memorial Fellowship, a grant intended to promote the professional development of individual counselors and to improve the practice of genetic counseling. This took persistence and a following a slightly different path than I had envisioned. My advice is don’t be afraid to take risks and get out of your comfort zone.

Adam: All research starts with a good idea. And our clinical experience can provide a wealth of research ideas. Pay attention to the whys that linger in your mind after seeing patients. Also, researchers fail. Sometimes spectacularly – unfunded grant proposals, rejected manuscripts, and studies that go off the rails. This is a particular challenge for the over-achievers who make up the ranks of genetics professionals. But, it’s an inevitable part of doing research that moves the field forward. Keep your head up, rely on the mentors Heather mentioned – they’re out there and they really do want to help – and learn from everything. Finally, find a research focus that gets you jazzed. It’s a lot easier to be persistent when you’re excited about your work.

NSGC: What genetic counseling research are you working on now?

Heather: My current research is on the vast under-diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) and issues that arise in communication of genetic information in FH families. There are 1 in 250 people out there with a treatable genetic cause of high cholesterol. It’s my research and my job to make sure that people with FH know the risks and have opportunities to prevent heart disease in their families. But as with anything having to do with families and communication, it’s complex. Our research team chips away at finding ways to screen families and help them become aware of their heart disease risks. We hope to give an opportunity to end the cycle of heart disease in their family.

Adam: I’m leading a group that was just funded by the NIH to study how children and their parents react to receiving genomic results for conditions that do not occur until adulthood (such as hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome). There are lots of intriguing questions we’re hoping to answer in this study, particularly about the psychosocial impact of this information and how family members use it to guide their healthcare. It’s a topic that has been written about a bunch, but there’s barely any empirical data to guide whether and how to provide this information to families in practice. We’re looking forward to adding our story to the mix and helping families in the process.

Heather Zierhut is the associate director of the University of Minnesota Graduate Program of Study in Genetic Counseling and assistant professor in Genetics, Cell Biology, and Development. Current areas of research include the psychosocial and public implications involved with the provision of genetic counseling services, implementations of whole genome sequencing, and outcomes of genetic counseling. 

Adam Buchanan is an assistant professor in the Genomic Medicine Institute at Geisinger, Co-Director of the MyCode Genomic Screening and Counseling program, and a member of the American Board of Genetic Counseling. His research focuses on access to genetic counseling and assessing behavioral and psychosocial outcomes of genetic counseling. 

Starting Your Postdoc Hunt: When and How to Prepare

Posted By: Rohit Thakur, Marie Sklodowska-Curie research fellow, University of Leeds, United Kingdom

“What are your plans after PhD”? – one of the most daunting and stressful questions often asked to graduate students. For many pursuing a career in academia, the obvious next step is a postdoctoral position.

The ideal time to start applying for postdocs is one year away from your graduation. At the beginning of the final year of my PhD, I made a list of institutes to explore. Based on this list, I directly contacted the principal investigators (PIs) whose work I found really exciting. After hearing back from them, I arranged a meeting with them to learn about their research. This provided a wonderful opportunity to network and establish professional relationships with them.

I also found the Conference to Career chat sessions with field experts extremely useful. At one of the sessions, Prof. Fred Winston shared very useful tips on setting criteria for choosing a postdoc lab, such as quality of mentorship, success rate of previous postdocs in academia, and publication rate of the lab. If you start early you are more likely to end up with multiple offers by the time you finish your PhD.

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Mr. Thakur discusses his poster presentation with Martin Lauss, PhD, Lund University, at the 2017 Joint GenoMEL/BioGenoMEL/MELGEN Scientific Meeting (courtesy Mr. Thakur)

Don’t Underestimate Geography

Starting a postdoc hunt can be overwhelming, given the numerous places a graduate student can potentially apply to. It can become easier if you can think about where (geographically) you would like to do a postdoc. After identifying a region, you just have to locate the productive labs that do the science that you find exciting.

Network, Network, Network!

If you are going to a conference, write to PIs beforehand whose work you find interesting. Network with them by inviting them to your poster and follow up with them afterward.

Start Your Application Early

Visit lab websites of PIs who you are interested in working with and pay close attention to the lab’s current interests required skills for postdocs. Use this time to develop a skill that will increase your visibility as a potential candidate. Write PIs an informal query about potential postdoc positions to PIs, including your CV and cover letter, and get your material proofread by your mentor and colleagues.

Get Your PhD Research Paper Ready to Submit

Showcasing your PhD research is a great way to convince future PIs about your skills and your ability to lead a project independently. If you have a paper ready to be submitted to a journal, get its preprint out on bioRxiv and mention it on your CV.

Seek Advice and Feedback

If you are contacting a field expert, openly ask for feedback and advice about your current research project. This is a great way to interact and establish professional relationships with PIs.

Finally, get out of your comfort zone. Aim higher but be realistic. Keep applying until you land an offer from your dream lab. I would also recommend attending the ASHG/JAX Conference to Career Program for honing your networking skills.

Acknowledgments: I am highly thankful to my supervisors Jenny Barrett, PhD; Julia Newton-Bishop, MD, MBChB, FMedSci; Jeremie Nsengimana, PhD; and Göran Jönsson, PhD, for their exceptional mentorship; and European Commission Horizon 2020 program for funding my PhD.

Rohit Thakur, B. Tech, is a PhD Candidate at the University of Leeds. He has been an ASHG member since 2017.

 

Welcome HHMI-ASHG Fellow, Sarah Abdallah

Posted By: Ann Klinck, ASHG Communications and Marketing Assistant

ASHG is excited to be partnering with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) for the HHMI-ASHG Medical Research Fellowship. We’re happy to welcome third-year Yale medical student, Sarah Abdallah, to the position.

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Sarah Abdallah, HHMI-ASHG Medical Research Fellow (Courtesy Ms. Abdallah)

This program allows medical, dental, and veterinary students to take a year off from training and perform mentored laboratory research with support of a grant. “Our hope is that the experience will ignite students’ passion for research and encourage them to pursue careers as physician-scientists,” says David Asai, HHMI’s senior director for science education in a press release.

Sarah was interested in the fellowship because “it seemed to provide access to a community of scientists and to enriching experiences on top of my research, like attending conferences and meetings.”

Sarah’s research is focused around obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Specifically, it involves looking for post-zygotic variants in whole-exome sequencing data from individuals with OCD and their parents. These variants arise spontaneously and are not inherited from parents. By identifying the post-zygotic variants, it may be possible to understand the contribution of such variation to OCD development, identify risk genes, and eventually find new treatments.

“I am hoping this project will contribute to the collective understanding of the genetic basis of OCD. Many people with OCD do well, but I have seen firsthand how it can present as a very disabling, persistent disorder, and current pharmacologic treatments are not completely effective for all patients,” Sarah said.

ASHG member and Sarah’s primary mentor, Thomas Fernandez, MD, is an assistant professor in the Child Study Center and of Psychiatry at Yale. Another ASHG member and her co-mentor, James Noonan, PhD, is an associate professor of genetics at Yale.

During her fellowship, Sarah is hoping to gain more experience in computational genomics and is seeking guidance on how to combine her clinical and research interests into a career. She trusts that people like Dr. Fernandez will be able help her find the right path. She is considering a career in child psychiatry and pediatrics, but “either way, I hope to keep contributing to research on the genomics of neurodevelopmental disorders along with my clinical practice,” she said.

Launched 29 years ago, the HHMI Medical Research Fellows Program supports each Fellow through a year-long research project with a mentor of the Fellow’s choosing, and facilitates peer networking among Fellows and alumni as well as seminars with senior investigators. For more information, see the Program website.