Hurricane Irma and Impact on ASHG 2017 in Orlando

Posted by: Mona Miller, ASHG Executive Director

ASHG’s thoughts and concern go out to all those affected by Hurricane Irma, as well as those recovering from Hurricane Harvey.

As ASHG 2017 will take place in Orlando, Florida, we have received several queries about any impact on the meeting. We are in regular touch with local authorities and convention center staff, who report all facilities should be ready to welcome ASHG attendees as planned, and we will continue to monitor the situation. We encourage our members to consider contributions to the respected aid organizations of their choice to help all those affected throughout the two regions.

See you in Orlando!

Hurricane Harvey

Posted by: Mona Miller, ASHG Executive Director

As you have likely seen in the news, Hurricane Harvey has caused major flooding and difficult conditions in Houston and the surrounding cities. Our thoughts are with our members, colleagues, the broader scientific community in southeast Texas, and all affected – we hope you and your loved ones are safe.

You may know that The American Journal of Human Genetics editorial office is located in Houston. AJHG’s website notes that their staff is safe, but there might be delays in responding to editorial questions over the next week.

Given that the ASHG 2017 early registration deadline is today, we are providing an extension for those affected by the hurricane. Please email registration@ashg.org for details.

Our thoughts remain with everyone affected.

Bill Gates and Francis Collins to Headline ASHG 2017 Presidential Symposium

Posted by: Nancy J. Cox, ASHG President; and Peter C. Scacheri, Chair of ASHG’s Program Committee

We are pleased to share some exciting news with the ASHG community: this year’s Presidential Symposium will feature a discussion of global health and genomics between two absolute legends in the health and science world: Bill Gates, Co-chair and Trustee of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and Francis Collins, MD, PhD, Director of the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

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(L) Bill Gates, Co-chair and Trustee, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; (R) Francis Collins, MD, PhD, Director, National Institutes of Health

During the 90-minute symposium, taking place Wednesday, October 18, 5:00-6:30 pm, Dr. Collins and Mr. Gates will address these topics and selected audience questions in an informal, conversational format.

This event will be open to all ASHG scientific registrants, so if you haven’t registered yet, now’s a great time to do so. More details on the symposium, including security considerations and how to submit your questions, will be made available as the date approaches.

We look forward to seeing you in Orlando.

Nancy Cox, PhD, ASHG President, directs the Vanderbilt Genetics Institute and is the Mary Phillips Edmonds Gray Professor of Genetics. She is also the Director of and a Professor of Medicine in the Vanderbilt Division of Genetic Medicine. Peter C. Scacheri, PhD, is 2017 Chair of the ASHG Program Committee. He is a Professor in the Department of Genetics and Genome Sciences at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and has been a member of ASHG since 2006.

Revamped for 2017: ASHG/FASEB Mentored Travel Awards for Underrepresented Trainees

Posted by: Kanika Pulliam, PhD, ASHG Educational Programs Manager

This year, ASHG and the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) are offering a newly structured travel award for underrepresented* trainees who are full-time undergraduate, graduate, medical students, and postdoctoral/clinical fellows who attend ASHG 2017.

Applications are due August 31, 2017 at 5:00 pm U.S. Eastern Time. Email questions and completed applications to marcssm@faseb.org.

What makes this travel award unique is its goal is to provide engaged and structured mentoring for trainees attending the meeting. This is fostered by assigning each awardee a peer mentor based on common interest.

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Networking and mentoring are important parts of the revamped ASHG/FASEB travel awards. (credit: ASHG)

The mentorship process starts before ASHG 2017 and continues during and after the meeting. Peer mentors will begin communicating with awardees before the meeting through a series of activities, including helping awardees choose events and sessions to attend and establishing their career interests to customize the meeting experience.

During the meeting, awardees will practice their presentations with their peer mentors and receive feedback. Peer mentors will also help awardees identify Exhibit Hall booths to visit based on their career interests, attend a social event together to practice networking, view poster and platform presentations to learn how to ask questions, and critique presentations. After the meeting, peer mentors will follow up with awardees by continuing to provide professional development support.

Peer mentors are selected based on their experience attending the meeting and their proximity in career development to the trainee awardee, which makes the relationship more relaxed. We have selected a diverse group of mentors spanning academia, industry, medicine, science education, and non-profits.

Awardees are required to attend specific trainee events and visit the Career Center to advance their networking skills and professional development. Here are the required events:

Wednesday, October 18

  • Diversity Breakfast, 7:15-8:45am

Choose 1 of the following concurrent sessions:

  • Trainee Professional Development Program (Academic Career Panel), 12:30-1:45pm, OR
  • Trainee-Mentor Luncheon (1), 12:30-1:45pm

Thursday, October 19

Choose 1 of the following concurrent sessions:

  • Trainee Professional Development Program (Passion Won’t Pay the Bills: Planning for a Successful Scientific Career), 12:30-1:45pm, OR
  • Trainee-Mentor Luncheon (2), 12:30-1:45pm

Friday, October 20

Choose 1 of the following concurrent sessions

  • Trainee Professional Development Program (Industry Career Panel), 1-2:15pm, OR
  • Mock NIH Study Section Workshop, 1-2:15pm

The travel award provides up to $1,850 in reimbursable funds for registration and travel. Applicants are required to submit and present (poster/oral) at ASHG 2017. Eligible applicants must be United States citizens or permanent residents with legal status. Trainees can be from minority institutions and historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) or underrepresented trainees from majority institutions. Preference for the award is given to ASHG members.

* For the purpose of meeting the goals and objectives specified by the FASEB Diversity Resources Program, individuals from groups underrepresented in the biomedical, clinical, and behavioral sciences include: 

  • Individuals from racial and ethnic groups shown to be underrepresented in biomedical research, including Blacks or African Americans, Hispanics or Latinos, American Indians (who maintain tribal affiliation or community attachment) or Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and other U.S. Pacific Islanders (Guam, American Samoa);
  • Individuals with disabilities, defined as those with a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities; and
  • Individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds [usually undergraduate students], defined as those from a family with an annual income below established low-income thresholds and those who come from an educational environment that has inhibited the individual from obtaining the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to develop and participate in a research career.

Kanika Pulliam, PhD, is ASHG’s Educational Programs Manager. Learn more about ASHG’s programs for trainees, including programs at ASHG 2017.

Snapshots from the July Program Committee Meeting

Posted By: Pauline Minhinnett, Director of Meetings; and Emily Greene, Meetings Program Coordinator

Earlier this week, the ASHG Program Committee gathered in Bethesda, Maryland, to create and assemble the ASHG 2017 scientific program. Having reviewed more than 3,100 submitted abstracts, with help from more than 100 reviewers, the Committee met in person to bring the highest-scoring work together into themed sessions for the meeting’s three Featured Plenary Abstract Sessions and five Platform Sessions. They used early registration data to assign sessions to rooms, ordered presentations within each session to tell a coherent story, and selected Reviewers’ Choice Abstracts among top-scoring posters. They also discussed educational events at the meeting, trainee opportunities, and abstracts of interest to press.

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PC members alternated small group work with full-committee presentations as each session was constructed.
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Large group discussions informed the scientific program and planning for future years.
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The ASHG 2017 Program Committee

In the coming weeks, the Committee will select and confirm moderators, make any necessary adjustments, and continue planning Tuesday’s Poster Talks session. Those who submitted abstracts should receive their program assignment in mid-August.

Pauline Minhinnett, CMP, CEM, and Emily Greene, MS, are part of ASHG’s Meetings Department. Learn more about the ASHG 2017 Annual Meeting, October 17-21 in Orlando, Florida.

An ASHG Fellow’s Perspective on Conference Prep, Part 2: Conference Events

Posted by: Teresa Ramírez, PhD, 2016-17 ASHG/NHGRI Genetics & Education Fellow

See Part 1 of Teresa’s guide, which focuses on networking

Conferences offer a variety of networking events you should fully take advantage of, but keep in mind that scientific sessions and visiting the exhibit hall can also provide new opportunities.

Before attending a conference, it is always a good idea to glance at the agenda and mark workshops of interest. Identify speakers whom you would like to meet. Each conference is unique because each offers various workshops, resources for different career levels, and receptions that allow you to network in a safe space. There is no need to feel shy or stay quiet at a conference; you can always ask questions. Use this time to explore, learn, listen, and communicate.

Use Presenting as an Opportunity

Each conference I’ve attended has provided me with great opportunities that I would have never imagined. I have learned to feel more confident while presenting my research. Was I nervous? Of course, but the more I practiced, the more comfortable I felt. Constructive feedback from people who visited my posters or talks has helped me improve my presentation skills. I was asked questions that provided me with great ideas about what to do next in my research project.

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Teresa Ramírez presents her research at the 2017 Japan-NIH Joint Symposium on Advances in Biomedical Research (courtesy Dr. Ramírez)

Presenting a poster or an oral presentation at a conference can also be a good way to interact with people at various career levels, which may lead you to discover similar interests. Be ready with your elevator pitch about your research (a minute or two) and your own branding statement (a simple statement). No need to be arrogant but in simple terms, describe who you are and your interests.

Remember the Exhibit Hall

Most conferences have an exhibit hall with vendors, institutions, resources, and career centers. Take advantage and visit them. This can help improve your networking skills or spark ideas for the next step of your career. By strolling around conference exhibit halls, I have learned about summer internships, scholarships, fellowships, post-baccalaureate programs, and graduate schools. Now, I learn about new job opportunities or professional/leadership training opportunities.

Relax and Enjoy the Experience

You never know whom you will meet or what you can learn from a conversation with a stranger. So make sure you have a plan but also go with the flow and enjoy every minute of your conference experience. Don’t stress about it. At conferences, I have met people who became life time friends and wonderful mentors who have been instrumental in my career through their advice and support.

Please check out the ASHG website for more information on trainee opportunities, resources, and ASHG 2017.

Teresa Ramírez, PhD, is the 2016-2017 ASHG/NHGRI Genetics & Education Fellow. Learn more about the Genetics & Education Fellowship.

An ASHG Fellow’s Perspective on Conference Prep, Part 1: Networking

Posted by: Teresa Ramírez, PhD, 2016-17 ASHG/NHGRI Genetics & Education Fellow

Attending national conferences can be intimidating or exciting. The first one I attended was quite overwhelming. Do you remember how you felt at yours? Did you ask yourself questions like: why is it important to attend a national conference? How do I prepare? How can I make the most of it? What should I do and how do I network? These thoughts can be nerve-wracking, but don’t worry: these tips will help ease your nerves and guide you to prepare for the next one.

Meet People and Follow Up

As an undergraduate student at California State University, Dominguez Hills, I participated in the NIH-funded Minority Biomedical Research Support (MBRS) program, where I learned about the do’s and don’ts of attending conferences. First, look and dress professionally because first impressions make a difference.

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Teresa Ramírez at a recent meeting of SACNAS (Advancing Chicanos/Hispanics & Native Americans in Science) (courtesy Dr. Ramírez)

Second, be sure to have business cards. It might seem outdated, but business cards can help break the ice and start conversations. I know that reaching out and introducing yourself might be uncomfortable, but it will all be worthwhile even if you end up feeling dead tired and drained. Make sure your business cards include your full name, degree/title, organization, contact information, LinkedIn URL, and something that can grab people’s attention in a positive way. One of my tips is to immediately write on the back of each card collected the date you met that person, key words to help you remember the conversation, and the name of the event/location. These notes are helpful because, believe it or not, you will start collecting tons of cards and by the end of the day, you will forget which card belongs to whom. Nurture these new relationships by writing follow up emails; showing interest and professionalism can set you apart.

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In 2016, Dr. Ramírez presented on STEM careers to a group of high school interns, a talk she was invited to give by a contact whom she met at a dinner. (courtesy Dr. Ramírez)

By networking, you never know who you can meet and what the outcome can be. You can meet your next mentor, find out about a new opportunity, or start a new collaboration. You might even get invited to do a research talk or share your story with K-16 students, like I did. Keep reminding yourself to be open-minded and network with new people during meals. Attendees usually feel comfortable sitting with people they know, but this is the right time to try sitting with unfamiliar faces to start a conversation. During this time, you have the opportunity to network, introduce yourself, and even use your scientific elevator pitch. I have sat in tables with total strangers feeling a little uncomfortable at first but at the end, had wonderful conversations and met new friends.

Please check out the ASHG website for more information on trainee opportunities, resources, and ASHG 2017.

Teresa Ramírez, PhD, is the 2016-2017 ASHG/NHGRI Genetics & Education Fellow. Learn more about the Genetics & Education Fellowship.