Announcing: AJHG “Perspectives” Series on Issues Confronting Human Genetics and Influencing Research

Posted By: David L. Nelson, ASHG President 

As part of our ongoing commitment to address how genetic findings are used in society and to foster discussion within the field and the public, I am pleased to announce that ASHG is launching a new “Perspectives” series of short statements this month, which will be published periodically in The American Journal of Human Genetics.

The first topic targets disturbing and scientifically flawed attempts to link genetics with racial supremacy. The statement denounces such attempts, stating that there can be no genetics-based support for claiming one group to be superior to another.

Read the statement on AJHG’s website.

We decided to address this important issue in the series’ first statement, recognizing that there has been a resurgence of bogus claims that racial supremacy has scientific roots. The statement explains that humans cannot be divided into biologically-distinct subcategories, given the considerable genetic overlap among members of different populations, and asserts clearly that genetics exposes the concept of ‘racial purity’ as scientifically meaningless.

This statement reflects a continuation of ASHG’s objection, over decades, to the misuse or twisting of human genetics findings for political or social ends, including past ASHG statements on genetics, ancestry, and intellectual ability and the consequences of eugenics; and more recently, my piece in the September member newsletter on the Society’s origins and early discussion of its purpose and role.

AJHG Perspectives: A Channel for Timely Discussion

Statements in the new series will address a variety of important topics in human genetics and its interface with society, reinforcing the Society’s and Journal’s role as a leading source of emerging human genetics science. They will offer timely, concise viewpoints on topics in research, health, and society that have been prioritized by the Board; will address how scientific research informs those issues; and may assert Society policy positions or note important related field activities.

Statements will also refer readers to a range of lengthier academic or other relevant work. They do not strive to cover the breadth and depth of each issue but rather to draw on, complement, and highlight the need for continuing research and member engagement.

AJHG has long been a leading home for discussion and debate about emerging science across human genetics. We are enthusiastic about this new feature, which will help ensure that scientific facts, findings, and open discussion inform larger societal dialogue,” said Bruce Korf, MD, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of AJHG.

Read an editorial announcing the new Perspectives series.

Fostering Discussion Within and Outside the Scientific Community

As research in human genetics continues to advance, it is opening new pathways of understanding and treatments that are saving lives. At the same time, ASHG has long been committed to addressing how these findings may be used in society, and we hope this new series will spark individual scientists to be increasingly vocal in discussing what the science does, might, and doesn’t say about a wide range of important issues, even—perhaps especially—when there is disagreement.

Individual members of our Society are knowledgeable, thoughtful, outspoken, and diverse in their views – these are the traits that push our field forward and help us collaboratively and thoughtfully address complex issues. Members, I encourage you to speak out, in your own voices, to represent your individual views as genetics experts on this and other important topics.

Given ASHG’s broad community of researchers, clinicians, ethicists, and other professionals, we anticipate perspectives on many topics may spark a diversity of dialogue, with strongly held perspectives on the science. We look forward to continuing that discussion through the pages of AJHG and hope to spark ongoing, constructive dialogue in the laboratory, classroom, clinic, and across the broad range of colleagues interested in human genetics.

David L. Nelson, PhD, is President of ASHG. He is a Cullen Foundation Professor of Molecular and Human Genetics at the Baylor College of Medicine, Associate Director of the BCM Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center, and Director of the BCM Integrative Molecular and Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program. 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s