AJHG Welcomes Its New Editor: Q&A with Bruce Korf

Posted By: Staff

A warm welcome to Bruce R. Korf, MD, PhD, new Editor-in-Chief of The American Journal of Human Genetics (AJHG)! We chatted with Dr. Korf about his vision for the journal, which he also described in an editorial in this month’s AJHG.

BruceKorf_original
Bruce R. Korf, MD, PhD, Editor of AJHG

ASHG: What excites you about human genetics research today?

Bruce: Human genetics encompasses an enormous range of research activity. We are in a golden age of gene discovery, including the identification of genes that underlie rare disorders and revealing genetic contributions to common disorders. From my own perspective as a medical geneticist, it’s exciting that disorders we used to only be able to diagnose are now potentially treatable as we uncover the genetic mechanisms and underlying pathophysiology.

There is also fascinating research into human origins and history, independent of medical implications. As a reader of the Journal I did not previously focus on this type of work, but now as AJHG Editor, I am finding this work to be really interesting – these papers bring together ideas we can all relate to.

ASHG: How do you view AJHG’s role in advancing the field?

Bruce: AJHG is the place for geneticists to showcase their best research. It’s a forum to publish findings of broad interest in genetics, and has long been trusted for its scientific rigor, integrity, and careful review of manuscripts. It’s also a resource for the next generation of geneticists, to both encourage and educate early-career scientists and trainees.

As we learn more about ways to diagnose and increasingly, to treat genetic conditions, the Journal can be involved in publishing papers that demonstrate the clinical utility of these interventions – to show that they actually improve outcomes in a cost-effective way. Findings published in AJHG also help highlight the value of publicly funded research: this important work produces new knowledge that leads to better health care and outcomes.

ASHG: ASHG members receive a free subscription to AJHG and are exempt from publishing fees. What other benefits does AJHG offer members?

Bruce: When you’re reading AJHG, you’re looking at the final product of an intense team process. Our staff and editorial board share a strong sense that the papers should represent as carefully vetted a story as possible, which happens at every step from submission to review to acceptance and editing of manuscripts. AJHG and Cell Press put in a lot of effort to ensure reliability of the findings we publish.

The Journal can also serve as an educational forum, for example to help trainees understand the background of why and how a study was put together.

As AJHG is the Society’s journal, we would welcome members’ advice and suggestions on what we can do better, do more of, etc.

ASHG: Are there new areas of emphasis where you’d like to see more submissions?

Bruce: Genetics has advanced tremendously in recent years, and conditions that we could previously only identify can now be treated. I would love to see more submissions on treatment, from preclinical testing to even reporting of clinical trials.

Cancer genetics is another area of interest. Historically, many cancer papers published in AJHG have emphasized germline and Mendelian changes associated with cancer risk. I would like to see more submissions on somatic cancer genetics in addition to work on inherited predisposition to cancer.

ASHG: You’ve also expressed interest in addressing genetics questions that affect society more broadly. Tell us about that.

Bruce: Advances in genetics are bringing up ELSI-related questions, such as how to responsibly use genetic information and how to protect genetic privacy. We look to ASHG to serve as a voice of reason and thoughtful analysis, weighing in on important issues of the day through Society statements. Beyond those statements, I would like to see more Commentaries from individuals in the genetics community, which provide a venue to share personal opinions and generate thoughtful discussion.

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