Expanding Role for Genetic Counselors: Good for Our Profession, Great for Our Patients

Guest Post By: Erica Ramos, MS, CGC, President-Elect, National Society of Genetic Counselors

As we observe the first annual Genetic Counselor Awareness Day on Nov. 9, I can’t help but be astonished by the changes in our profession and how they are shaping, and being shaped by, the exciting advances in how we diagnose and treat genetically-influenced conditions. As President-Elect of the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC), I have never been more proud or excited to declare “I am a genetic counselor!” and share how we bring the voice of patients and clinicians to all areas and applications of genomics.

20171109_EricaRamos
Erica Ramos, MS, CGC (courtesy NSGC)

When I completed my genetic counseling training in 2001, I couldn’t have predicted that I would find myself working on the leading edge of clinical genomics. When I began working at a genomics biotechnology company in 2012, I was only the second genetic counselor on staff. According to the 2012 NSGC Professional Status Survey (PSS), a mere 0.5% of our profession was employed by R&D or biotechnology companies.

Four years later, the 2016 PSS showed this had doubled. Today, there are 17 genetic counselors at my company, working collaboratively with scientists, bioinformaticians, developers and executives, contributing our skills and expertise to areas such as medical affairs, market development, product marketing and strategic planning, and sharing the real-world impact that their work ultimately has on patients and their families.

Mine is just one example of genetic counselors’ expanding roles. We are leading patient-centered original research and are integral to Geisinger’s MyCode study, The Ohio State University’s Statewide Colon Cancer Initiative and All of Us, to name just a few. We are driving growth and change in clinic by branching into specialty areas including neurogenetics and psychiatric genetics. NSGC surveys tell the story: In the 10 years leading up to 2016, the number of specialty areas where genetic counselors work went from 14 to 33, a 135% increase.

Vast and exciting career opportunities are fantastic for the genetic counseling profession and ensure a bright future for those entering our field. But as good as this trend is for our profession and the 4,000 certified genetic counselors in the U.S., the benefits are even greater for other genomics professionals and, critically, to patients.

Genetic counselors have deep scientific and medical knowledge. Paired with our communications and counseling skills, we are a valuable resource in translating research advances in genetics and genomics to healthcare providers and patients. As media coverage of these advances expands, providers and patients often have questions about how these new discoveries impact their care. We unravel the complexities of research so that clinicians and patients receive clear, accurate and digestible information, regardless of their culture or background.

So, here’s to Genetic Counselor Awareness Day! Working together to improve appreciation and understanding of how we and our partners in genomics empower patients and their healthcare team and provide them with ever improving personalized attention and care.

Erica Ramos, MS, CGC, is President-Elect of the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC). She has been a member of ASHG since 2014. 

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